3 myths fuelling the narrative on gender and millennials

3 myths fuelling the narrative on gender and millennials

Gender and millennials

3 myths fuelling the narrative
three myths fuelling the narrative on gender and millennials

Over the last year, I have taken an interest in people’s ability to separate spin from substance, and how these fuel narratives. Narratives that are not necessarily true and hence not helpful. Here are the top three myths I have found fuelling the narrative on gender and millennials.

Millennials need purpose

You’re sitting in a conference organised by a very reputable organisation. Subconsciously, you assume there was some level of diligence in finding and curating speakers. You listen intently to the content. You see someone in the audience grab onto a good soundbite and you see it pop up on your twitter feed. Others like it, share it. But did the soundbite have any substance?

I saw this happen at a conference when one of the speakers said, “Millennials are different, they need purpose.” Is that true? Is purpose unique to millennials or is it a human need? So, I put my hand up to explore the speaker’s view. One of her fellow panellists jumped in, a futurist no less and said, “Millennials are different because this is the first time they are creating movements.” I was floored by this comment. Did Martin Luther King Jr and Gandhi not create movements? Emily Pankhurst’s movement seems to have been forgotten too – ironic considering both these speakers were women. I think the futurist would do well in studying some history. For the record – humans do best when they have purpose. It doesn’t have to be grandiose – being a decent human being will do.

Millennials are tech-savvy

I was chairing a panel at a banking and finance conference geared to university students. The topic of the next generation came up and one of the panellists said, “Oh the next generation are impressive, they’re very tech-savvy.” Really? Let’s test it. I turned to the audience and asked, “I’m curious, who here has heard of blockchain”. There were around 150 people in the room. Not a single hand went up. “Ok, who’s heard of cryptocurrency or bitcoin?” This time, half the hands went up. I explained blockchain is the technology behind cryptocurrencies. I turned back to the panel. They were speechless.

For women to progress, they need female role models

Role models are important. But does the gender matter? Is it women that need the role models or men? In interviewing men, I discovered a pattern amongst those who support women – they have a positive relationship with a female relative. Typically a mother or grandmother, who is oftentimes seen as a role model. Alternatively, they have seen a positive and respectful interaction between their parents. Interestingly, the significance of this is not in their conscious awareness and is only identified through a different style of interviewing. A style of interviewing which seeks to understand the person, not just the fit for the role. So, what can you do going forward? When presented with information or a data point ask:

  1. Is this true?
  2. Based on what evidence?
  3. What evidence is there to the contrary?
  4. What therefore do I choose to think, believe and share?

Take nothing for granted, assume nothing and be the best you can be.

Over the last year, I have taken an interest in people’s ability to separate spin from substance, and how these fuel narratives. Narratives that are not necessarily true and hence not helpful. Here are the top three myths I have found fuelling the narrative on gender and millennials.

Millennials need purpose

You’re sitting in a conference organised by a very reputable organisation. Subconsciously, you assume there was some level of diligence in finding and curating speakers. You listen intently to the content. You see someone in the audience grab onto a good soundbite and you see it pop up on your twitter feed. Others like it, share it. But did the soundbite have any substance?

I saw this happen at a conference when one of the speakers said, “Millennials are different, they need purpose.” Is that true? Is purpose unique to millennials or is it a human need? So, I put my hand up to explore the speaker’s view. One of her fellow panellists jumped in, a futurist no less and said, “Millennials are different because this is the first time they are creating movements.” I was floored by this comment. Did Martin Luther King Jr and Gandhi not create movements? Emily Pankhurst’s movement seems to have been forgotten too – ironic considering both these speakers were women. I think the futurist would do well in studying some history. For the record – humans do best when they have purpose. It doesn’t have to be grandiose – being a decent human being will do.

Millennials are tech-savvy

I was chairing a panel at a banking and finance conference geared to university students. The topic of the next generation came up and one of the panellists said, “Oh the next generation are impressive, they’re very tech-savvy.” Really? Let’s test it. I turned to the audience and asked, “I’m curious, who here has heard of blockchain”. There were around 150 people in the room. Not a single hand went up. “Ok, who’s heard of cryptocurrency or bitcoin?” This time, half the hands went up. I explained blockchain is the technology behind cryptocurrencies. I turned back to the panel. They were speechless.

For women to progress, they need female role models

Role models are important. But does the gender matter? Is it women that need the role models or men? In interviewing men, I discovered a pattern amongst those who support women – they have a positive relationship with a female relative. Typically a mother or grandmother, who is oftentimes seen as a role model. Alternatively, they have seen a positive and respectful interaction between their parents. Interestingly, the significance of this is not in their conscious awareness and is only identified through a different style of interviewing. A style of interviewing which seeks to understand the person, not just the fit for the role. So, what can you do going forward? When presented with information or a data point ask:

  1. Is this true?
  2. Based on what evidence?
  3. What evidence is there to the contrary?
  4. What therefore do I choose to think, believe and share?

Take nothing for granted, assume nothing and be the best you can be.

Take nothing for granted, assume nothing and be the best you can be.

Water and Wealth Creation

On a trip to Kenya, we were faced with a village that required access to clean water. Their wish was to have water, to grow crop that would in turn provide them with the money to educate the boys and the girls of the community (traditionally only the boys were...

A fresh perspective on Women and Leadership

A fresh perspective on Women and Leadership

Female Leadership

A fresh perspective on Women and Leadership
It always amuses me to see the look of bewilderment when people hear that I love working in the Middle East, and even more surprised when they find out I had a successful practice in the region. This surprise is for the simple reason that I’m a woman.

I understand how there is a perception that women are not respected or highly regarded in the Middle East, therefore making it difficult to fathom how a woman could have a successful business. But in my experience, the traits that seem to be more abundant amongst women, such as insight, intuition and inclusion, seem to be trusted and appreciated in the Middle East, enabling us to not only contribute but also play our role in business

But I am just as bewildered as those who find my success in the Middle East surprising, by some of the rhetoric around women in the workplace and leadership in the UK and London specifically. A recent article on the matter pointed out that 15% of Senior Leadership roles in the City were held by women, and the majority of those by foreigners. The article went further by attributing this ‘fact’ to the foreign women’s swagger. The truth of the matter is, given that London is a global financial center, there is a strong likelihood that a senior leadership role will have a regional or global focus and if the potential candidates haven’t had any international experience, they simply don’t qualify, swagger or not.

That said, the ‘swagger’ comment did get me thinking, and led me to reflect on the great Arab women I have had the privilege of interviewing and working with. They are highly intelligent, very well-educated and extremely insightful – ingredients which are prevalent amongst many women around the world. They don’t seek to be liked but rather have the courage of their convictions. They don’t have to speak loudly or demand to be listened to, but still have their views be known and considered. They tend to speak less and act more. They are compassionate and kind but don’t tolerate fools.  But above all else, there is a particular ingredient in their presence and demeanor, described perfectly by a dear friend from the region – “we are salty not sweet”.

 

From Segregation to Sisterhood

It’s fascinating when you think about it. Yes, women in the region tend to live more segregated lives. This means that instead of competing with men, they understand and nurture the concept of sisterhood, encouraging and supporting each other. When they get older and enter the corporate realm, government or family business, they are purposeful and have a quiet self-confidence, an inner strength which is ready to come out and be deployed in a broader spectrum. And contrary to popular belief, they are welcomed in the workplace and encouraged to grow and rise through the ranks. Have they had challenges to overcome? Absolutely. Challenges have shaped their character, balancing their resilience, perseverance and determination, together with their faith, patience and belief in a higher power. Formidable indeed.

So what are some of the ingredients that help foster women’s capabilities in this way that we could instill to make our companies more balanced, diverse and better equipped to handle the changing times?

 

Vision & Purpose

If you want to attract, nurture and keep the best women, consider what difference your business makes, why it matters. Frankly, if your business isn’t concerned with anything other than profit, you are going to face challenges in finding and keeping people with character and competence – women  or men.

 

Interview From the Inside Out

If you are using an interview simply as a checkbox exercise to see if the person has the skills for a particular job, you are missing out on a great opportunity. A person’s CV is merely a scratch on the surface of not only who this person really is, but also how far their capabilities can extend. Context is key.

As a starter, why don’t you put the CV aside and get them to tell you their story. Adopt a curious mind,  seeking to learn about the person’s experiences that has brought them to the present day. This approach can open up an individual’s character, their way of thinking, approach to challenges, and the environment and factors needed to bring out their best. You never know – you could even learn something along the way.

 

Don’t Hire What You Don’t Appreciate

This may seem a bit of a shock, but frankly, if you don’t see how someone adds value to your organisation, why hire them? And if the person is onboard, why aren’t you listening to their viewpoint and perspective?  If you want yes people who just go along with what you say, you are wasting your money in hiring great people. A recorded message to yourself telling you you’re doing a good job will suffice. But if you hire us, listen to us. We have a different perspective. It may not be what you want to hear but we are here to add value. Allow us – there are skills, traits and natural capabilities just waiting to be engaged. If you don’t appreciate us, we’ll find someone who does.

 

As featured in Women’s Prospects 

It always amuses me to see the look of bewilderment when people hear that I love working in the Middle East, and even more surprised when they find out I had a successful practice in the region. This surprise is for the simple reason that I’m a woman.

I understand how there is a perception that women are not respected or highly regarded in the Middle East, therefore making it difficult to fathom how a woman could have a successful business. But in my experience, the traits that seem to be more abundant amongst women, such as insight, intuition and inclusion, seem to be trusted and appreciated in the Middle East, enabling us to not only contribute but also play our role in business

But I am just as bewildered as those who find my success in the Middle East surprising, by some of the rhetoric around women in the workplace and leadership in the UK and London specifically. A recent article on the matter pointed out that 15% of Senior Leadership roles in the City were held by women, and the majority of those by foreigners. The article went further by attributing this ‘fact’ to the foreign women’s swagger. The truth of the matter is, given that London is a global financial center, there is a strong likelihood that a senior leadership role will have a regional or global focus and if the potential candidates haven’t had any international experience, they simply don’t qualify, swagger or not.

That said, the ‘swagger’ comment did get me thinking, and led me to reflect on the great Arab women I have had the privilege of interviewing and working with. They are highly intelligent, very well-educated and extremely insightful – ingredients which are prevalent amongst many women around the world. They don’t seek to be liked but rather have the courage of their convictions. They don’t have to speak loudly or demand to be listened to, but still have their views be known and considered. They tend to speak less and act more. They are compassionate and kind but don’t tolerate fools.  But above all else, there is a particular ingredient in their presence and demeanor, described perfectly by a dear friend from the region – “we are salty not sweet”.

 

From Segregation to Sisterhood

It’s fascinating when you think about it. Yes, women in the region tend to live more segregated lives. This means that instead of competing with men, they understand and nurture the concept of sisterhood, encouraging and supporting each other. When they get older and enter the corporate realm, government or family business, they are purposeful and have a quiet self-confidence, an inner strength which is ready to come out and be deployed in a broader spectrum. And contrary to popular belief, they are welcomed in the workplace and encouraged to grow and rise through the ranks. Have they had challenges to overcome? Absolutely. Challenges have shaped their character, balancing their resilience, perseverance and determination, together with their faith, patience and belief in a higher power. Formidable indeed.

So what are some of the ingredients that help foster women’s capabilities in this way that we could instill to make our companies more balanced, diverse and better equipped to handle the changing times?

 

Vision & Purpose

If you want to attract, nurture and keep the best women, consider what difference your business makes, why it matters. Frankly, if your business isn’t concerned with anything other than profit, you are going to face challenges in finding and keeping people with character and competence – women  or men.

 

Interview From the Inside Out

If you are using an interview simply as a checkbox exercise to see if the person has the skills for a particular job, you are missing out on a great opportunity. A person’s CV is merely a scratch on the surface of not only who this person really is, but also how far their capabilities can extend. Context is key.

As a starter, why don’t you put the CV aside and get them to tell you their story. Adopt a curious mind,  seeking to learn about the person’s experiences that has brought them to the present day. This approach can open up an individual’s character, their way of thinking, approach to challenges, and the environment and factors needed to bring out their best. You never know – you could even learn something along the way.

 

Don’t Hire What You Don’t Appreciate

This may seem a bit of a shock, but frankly, if you don’t see how someone adds value to your organisation, why hire them? And if the person is onboard, why aren’t you listening to their viewpoint and perspective?  If you want yes people who just go along with what you say, you are wasting your money in hiring great people. A recorded message to yourself telling you you’re doing a good job will suffice. But if you hire us, listen to us. We have a different perspective. It may not be what you want to hear but we are here to add value. Allow us – there are skills, traits and natural capabilities just waiting to be engaged. If you don’t appreciate us, we’ll find someone who does.

 

As featured in Women’s Prospects 

Water and Wealth Creation

On a trip to Kenya, we were faced with a village that required access to clean water. Their wish was to have water, to grow crop that would in turn provide them with the money to educate the boys and the girls of the community (traditionally only the boys were...